Some Types of Cancer Might Have Obesity Link

Columbus Dispatch

Obesity is contributing to an increase in certain types of cancer, even as cancer deaths overall continue to decline, national health leaders said in an annual cancer report issued yesterday. The report was put together by the American Cancer Society, the CDC, the National Cancer Institute and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Obesity’s role in a variety of diseases should be routinely discussed in doctors’ offices, said Dr. Peter Shields, deputy director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center.  The problem is that most people are getting that message one way or another but aren’t listening, Shields said.

He and the other authors of the report looked at an analysis of more than 7,000 studies that examined the relationships among nutrition, physical activity, excess weight and cancer risk.

There is convincing evidence that being overweight or obese can contribute to breast cancer in postmenopausal women, endometrial cancer, colorectal cancer and cancers of the kidney, esophagus and pancreas, the report says.

“Maintaining a healthy weight throughout life may be among the most-important ways to prevent cancer, particularly for individuals who do not smoke,” the report says.

From 1999 to 2008, kidney-cancer incidence increased by 2.9 percent per year in men and 3.3 percent in women. Pancreatic cancer increased by about 1.2 percent a year in men and women during that time.

From 1992 to 2008, a type of esophageal cancer called adenocarcinoma increased by 2.6 percent per year in men and 3.3 percent per year in women.

The report was put together by the American Cancer Society, the CDC, the National Cancer Institute and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries.

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This coverage is the result of pitching efforts by OSU Wexner Medical Center Public Affairs and Media Relations.

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